advertising

All posts tagged advertising

Webinar: Which Type of Google Ad is Right for Your Tourism Business?

by Kelly Kubrick on October 23, 2019

Upcoming Webinar: November 7th, 2019 at 2PM EST

Please join me, Kelly Kubrick, online at eLearningU.com for a one-hour webinar:

Webinar title: Which Type of Google Ad is Right for Your Tourism Business?

Search vs Shopping vs Display & Video/YouTube?

In this session Kelly Kubrick will talk about the different types of Google Ads and help you determine which ones are right for your tourism business. She will give tips, techniques, tactics that will improve your performance in each. During this session, Kelly will ensure attendees

  • Understand the differences between the various types of Google Ads;
  • Compare the characteristics of each to determine how best your business can leverage them;
  • Learn how to plan budgets, typical costs, typical returns and expected results to determine which Google Ad is right for your business; and
  • Ensure you know how best to succeed at this challenging, but proven advertising network.

If you are interested in learning more about Google advertising, contact Online Authority today.

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Kelly KubrickWebinar: Which Type of Google Ad is Right for Your Tourism Business?

Webinar: Spur Tourism Event Registrations using Facebook Advertising

by Kelly Kubrick on September 17, 2019

Upcoming Webinar: October 3rd, 2019 at 2PM EST

Please join me, Kelly Kubrick, online at eLearningU.com for a one-hour webinar:

Webinar title: Spur Tourism Event Registrations using Facebook Advertising

In this fast paced session Kelly Kubrick will show you, with real life examples, how to enhance the experience of attendees at live events by pairing it with a digital equivalent. Your advertising campaign objectives should include securing attendees to either or both events. In this real life case study, learn:

  • The inventory and necessary interplay of digital marketing assets – web, Facebook & email – you’ll need prior to your Facebook advertising campaign launch;
  • 3 critical audience segment you should organize your Facebook media spend by;
  • Key advance actions needed to coordinate the IRL (‘in-real-life’) and digital teams; and
  • How to put content to work to anticipate campaign impact prior to, during and post launch.

Creative for organic Facebook posts for the RCMP Horse Auction 2018

Learn more about this amazing event here:

If you are interested in learning more about Facebook advertising, contact Online Authority today.

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Kelly KubrickWebinar: Spur Tourism Event Registrations using Facebook Advertising

Dispel complexity with educational content using Google paid search advertising

by Kelly Kubrick on April 30, 2019

Campaign Objectives

The Canadian Commercial Corporation (CCC) wanted to promote the availability of a new ebook developed to explain its government-to-government (G2G) offering to Canadian manufacturers.

The Plan

In advance of the paid traffic campaign, CCC developed landing pages in English and French, containing an offer to download the ebook in exchange for providing contact information.

Where Digital Fit

In addition to its regular organic social media and email newsletters, CCC approved a paid search media buy on Google Ads. Online Authority was tasked with advising the internal team with how to plan the campaign, including how to undertake keyword research and how to structure its Ad Groups.

Online Authority provided advisory services to the CCC team on creative – copy and image treatments, and recommended keyword bid adjustments after an initial period in market.

ebook search ads english and french

Results:

Within days of launch, significant insights into the strongest keywords – as well as those worth excluding as negative keywords – were identified for CCC providing critical insights into the opportunities available to CCC’s business development efforts going forward.

If you are interested in learning more about paid search advertising, contact Online Authority today.

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Kelly KubrickDispel complexity with educational content using Google paid search advertising

Target prospects in key industries with LinkedIn advertising

by Kelly Kubrick on April 30, 2019

Campaign Objectives

In its strategic plan, the Canadian Commercial Corporation (CCC) identified key sectors of interest for expansion in its business development efforts. In addition to its significant trade show involvement, the CCC was executing a digital lead generation effort through content marketing.

The Plan:

To drive qualified traffic to its newly developed content marketing assets, the CCC approved a LinkedIn media buy, targeting industries that mapped to its sectors of interest.

In advance of the paid traffic campaign, the CCC developed blog post landing pages in English and French explaining its unique service offering to those particular industries.

Online Authority worked with CCC’s marketing team to set up the its LinkedIn Campaign Manager account, then identify and quantify potential ‘Audiences’ – narrowed by CCC’s targeting criteria – to pursue.

Next, Online Authority undertook the necessary technical implementation for a LinkedIn media buy for CCC, including:

  1. Generating the LinkedIn Campaign Manager Insight Tag;
  2. Installing and configuring the Insight Tag via the client’s content management systems account to ensure it was published to all templates;
  3. Setting up conversion tracking; and
  4. Advising on naming conventions for Google Analytics UTM tracking codes for use later in the campaign.

Online Authority provided advisory services to the CCC team on creative – copy and image treatments, activation and launch, and reporting throughout the duration of the campaign.

Aeroppace and Clean Tech ads

Results:

Within days of launch, the highest-performing audiences, by key sector, were identified for CCC providing critical insights into the opportunities available to CCC’s business development efforts going forward.

If you are interested in learning more about LinkedIn advertising, contact Online Authority today.

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Kelly KubrickTarget prospects in key industries with LinkedIn advertising

Increase awareness of funding availability with Google search advertising

by Kelly Kubrick on April 10, 2019

Campaign Objectives

The Federation of Canadian Municipalities (FCM) wanted to increase the number of municipal capital project funding applications initiated in its lead generation process.

The Plan:

In advance of the paid traffic campaign, FCM developed landing pages in English and French containing links to supporting documentation describing the funding application process.

Where digital fit:

In addition to its regular organic social media and email newsletters, FCM approved a paid search media buy on Google Ads. Online Authority was tasked with advising the internal team with how to plan the campaign, including how to undertake keyword research and how to structure its Ad Groups.

Online Authority provided advisory services to the FCM team on creative – copy and image treatments – including adjustments after an initial test period in market.

FCM Signature Projects Search Ad in English

Results:

The campaign launched ran for the duration of the funding season and additional tests were planned.

We can help

If you are interested in learning more about launching your Google paid Search campaign, contact Online Authority today.

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Kelly KubrickIncrease awareness of funding availability with Google search advertising

Achieve funding application targets with LinkedIn advertising

by Kelly Kubrick on March 31, 2019

Campaign Objectives

The Federation of Canadian Municipalities (FCM) needed to secure a particular number of municipal infrastructure funding applications, by a specific deadline, from a particular geographic segment.

The Plan:

In advance of the paid traffic campaign, FCM developed landing pages in English and French, containing links to supporting documentation describing the funding application process.

Where digital fit:

In addition to its regular organic social media and email newsletters, FCM approved a paid media buy on LinkedIn. Online Authority was tasked with advising the internal team how to structure its test plan to determine optimal placements and audiences. Online Authority supported the team’s efforts by researching, building and ‘saving’ additional pockets of target audiences on LinkedIn.

Next, Online Authority undertook the necessary technical implementation for a LinkedIn media buy for FCM, including:

  1. Generating the client’s LinkedIn Campaign Manager Insight Tag;
  2. Installing and configuring the Insight Tag via the client’s Google Tag Manager account to ensure it was published to all templates in the client’s content management system;
  3. Setting up conversion tracking; and
  4. Advising on naming conventions for Google Analytics UTM tracking codes for use later in the campaign.

Online Authority provided advisory services to the FCM team on creative – copy and image treatments – including adjustments after an initial test period in market.

LinkedIn Advertising MAMP

Results:

The campaign launched with alternative placements, and as the most effective ones were identified, the campaign was rolled out for the duration. Data proved the LinkedIn campaign contributed directly to the total applications received by the deadline.

We can help

If you are interested in learning more about LinkedIn advertising, contact Online Authority today.

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Kelly KubrickAchieve funding application targets with LinkedIn advertising

Drive product sales with Google Shopping advertising

by Kelly Kubrick on February 2, 2019

Campaign Objectives

MyLiberty.life, a Canadian online retailer, wanted to know if Google Search advertising could outperform Google Shopping in terms of product sales conversions.

Google Shopping vs Google Paid Search

Google Shopping allows retailers to run advertising campaigns to promote their product inventory. It all starts with the retailer sending, automatically, its product details to Google via Google’s Merchant Center offering. Once the product information has been uploaded, the retailer / merchant can create a Shopping campaign in Google Ads to display its wares.

Shopping ads placements are different from traditional text-only search ads, as they include a photo of the product, product title, price, store name, and more.

“Instead of keywords, Shopping ads use the product attributes you defined in your Merchant Center data feed to show your ads on relevant searches.” Source: Google

The Plan:

MyLiberty.life used a free application to automatically send its product data feed — stored in its ecommerce platform — to Google Merchant Center. From there, the Google Shopping campaign was created in Google Ads. Nearly all of the content for the ads is provided automatically through the data feed.

Here are screenshots showing an example of the creative for Google Shopping ad for Women’s underwear vs a traditional text-only search Google Paid Search ad vs another Google Shopping ad for Men’s underwear:

Example Creative Google Shopping vs Google Paid Search

 

For launch, Online Authority worked with MyLiberty.life to customize its Google Shopping ads to organize product groups using Custom Labels, reflective of their product collections.

Over several months, MyLiberty tested the performance of its Shopping campaign vs its Search campaign to see which drove the most conversions.

Results:

The Google Shopping Campaign delivered 3x the conversions of Search. Wow!

Armed with this critical data, MyLiberty.life re-allocated its budget accordingly and continues to devote a significantly higher proportion of its media spend to Shopping Ads versus other Google placements.

We can help

If you are a retailer with an ecommerce website and interested in learning more about Google Shopping advertising, contact Online Authority today.

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Kelly KubrickDrive product sales with Google Shopping advertising

Webinar: DAA Thought Leader Conversation with June Li

by Kelly Kubrick on December 21, 2018

Webinar: January 23, 2019 at 12:00 pm ET

Please join me, Kelly Kubrick, online as I have a great time moderating the “ABCs of Establishing Credibility”, a Digital Analytics Association‘s (DAA) Thought Leader Conversation with June Li, brought to you by WiA (Women in Analytics).

Digital Analytics Association logo

Webinar title: DAA Thought Leader Conversation with June Li brought to you by WiA: ABCs of Establishing Credibility

Join June Li, Founder & Managing Director of ClickInsight, for her thought leader conversation, ABCs of Establishing Credibility, facilitated by Kelly Kubrick, owner of Online Authority, open to all DAA members. A frequent frustration voiced by analysts and consultants is that their recommendations are ignored. Action is not taken. Although communication is part of the equation, even if you are crystal clear, if you do not have credibility, nothing will happen.

During this event, you will:

  1. See why credibility is more than credentials and experience.
  2. Understand how to establish credibility as an analyst, a leader and a consultant.
  3. Learn the simple rules for establishing, maintaining and growing credibility.

June-Li HeadshotJune Li is Founder and Managing Director of ClickInsight, a digital analytics specialist consultancy. A recognized expert in Digital Analytics and Certified Web Analyst, June has spoken at eMetrics, clickZ and Canadian Marketing Association conferences. An instructor at the University of Toronto, she has worked with DAA for over 10 years, helping create the online Digital Analytics Course Program with the University of British Columbia, and teaching DAA Essentials workshops. She has co-chaired the DAA’s Certification Board and helped found the DAA Toronto Local Chapter. In 2018, June was a finalist in the Difference Maker category for DAA’s Quantie Awards.

DAA Experience Level: All levels
Certified Web Analyst (CWA) Professional Development Units: 1

This event was made possible by the WiA sponsors Blast Analytics & Marketing and Tealium.

Previous DAA Thought Leader Conversations

Updated: This event is now available as a recording; register here to view it on GoToWebinar.

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Kelly KubrickWebinar: DAA Thought Leader Conversation with June Li

Spur Event Registrations using Facebook advertising

by Kelly Kubrick on November 16, 2018

Campaign Objectives

The RCMP Foundation, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police‘s charitable arm, sought registrants for its first-ever online horse auction. Those same registrants were also welcome to participate in a sister event, an in-person horse auction: “See inside the RCMP Foundation’s horse auction” from CBC News.

The Plan

In advance of the campaign launch, the RCMP Foundation developed English and French landing pages announcing details for each auctions, and encouraging visitors to register to bid on any of the 30+ magnificent Hanovarian horses available for sale.

Where digital fit

In addition to securing traditional media coverage including PR and advertising in horse industry magazines, see examples below:

and publishing organic social media content and distributing email newsletters, the RCMP Foundation approved a paid media advertising buy on Facebook.

While researching potential audiences to target on Facebook, Online Authority oversaw the technical implementation needed for a Facebook advertising campaign as undertaken by the RCMP Foundation’s agency:

Following that, in the client’s Facebook Ad account, Online Authority created targeted Website Custom Audiences (WCA) based on past buyer lists and website visitors. Online Authority also developed necessary naming conventions for Google Analytics UTM tracking codes to track the impact of email efforts vs the Facebook ad buy.

In its research, Online Authority identified 65 possible target audiences within Facebook for review and approval by the client. Those were narrowed to 23 optimal choices for launch. Online Authority created each as unique Facebook Ad Sets in order to monitor the performance of each audience against one another.

As the landing page continue to evolve, Online Authority finalized the paid media creative, including copy treatment, and the campaign was activated. Below are three sample placements of the creative that ran, and some of the response generated:

RCMP Foundation Horse Auction sample Facebook Ads

Campaign Results

All 23 ad sets launched simultaneously and performance of each was monitored on a daily basis. Within one week, the ad sets were narrowed to the top performers.

By the number of auction registrants, the approach proved so successful that the campaign was paused at the two-week of a planned six-week campaign. The best news for this fundraising effort? Further, all horses were sold with revenue targets exceeded.

If you are interested in learning more about Facebook advertising, contact Online Authority today.

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Kelly KubrickSpur Event Registrations using Facebook advertising

Align your Google Analytics Channel Groupings with your marcom plan

by Kelly Kubrick on April 17, 2017

Cast your mind back to Planes, Trains and Automobiles, the Steve Martin / John Candy comedy where those modes of transport were to deliver the travellers home. Media has a similar concept with sources, or channels, that deliver prospects to us. Traditionally, those channels included direct mail, radio or TV, and newspapers or magazines.

Today, we have “new” media sources like Google and Bing (search), or Facebook and Twitter (social). When rolled up into categories like Search or Social those categories are known as Channels. However, sources are increasingly fragmented (how many social networks are out there today?), distracting us from knowing which channels are working for us.

Are you confident you know which marcom activities are worth continued investment?

Picture a busy but under-resourced marketing communications team challenged with finding prospects for a new brand. From the get-go, this team has done everything right. They undertook comprehensive market research and used it as the foundation for their strategic plan. That plan led to multiple outreach tactics / activities:

  • Forming strategic partnerships with established, aligned, non-competing organizations
  • Creating relevant, valuable content to be shared across multiple social media networks
  • Publishing relevant blog posts to encourage community engagement
  • Producing a monthly educational email newsletter (with just a hint of promotion) to efficiently leverage their blog
  • Purchasing advertising to to uncover potential pockets of customers
  • Launching an affiliate marketing program to entice bloggers and other websites to promote their message for them

Further, the team put together a measurement plan with established targets, and set Google Analytics up correctly to ensure they captured ‘clean’ prospect data. And, gold star to them – they were executing comprehensive digital campaign tracking to measure the impact of their individual activities.

However as the time requirements for juggling that many activities increased, the available resources did not.

Increased pressure to undertake more (and more) activities without additional resources

Within a few months, everyone wanted to know if all the activities were worth the level of effort required to support them, or if some could / should be cut. However, even as the data flowed in, Google Analytics seemed disconnected from the team’s activities and their reports didn’t support decision making. For example:

The team regularly reviewed their Google Analytics’ Channels report, labelled in the Google Analytics interface as “Default Channel Grouping”.

Default Channels Grouping

Google Analytics Default Channels Grouping Report

If you aren’t familiar with it, Google explains that the Channels report displays

“rule-based groupings of your traffic sources, [showing] your data organized according to the Default Channel Grouping. Default groupings are the most common sources of traffic, like Paid Search and Direct.”

And, according to Google, this allows “you to quickly check the performance of each of your traffic channels.”

The problem is that Google’s Default Channel Groupings aren’t necessarily how organizations might describe their Channels internally. Further, Google’s language labelling the individual Channel might not even exist in your organization’s vocabulary.

Even with measurement best practices, it can be hard to prioritize

So, although the concept of Channels makes sense in theory, typically, the Default Channel Groupings only make sense to the person familiar with your Google Analytics UTM code naming conventions. And, as with many organizations, the majority of the marketing communications team members weren’t familiar with the UTM name/value pair naming conventions (how are we counting paid social? is our email traffic really captured correctly?).

This meant team members weren’t confident in knowing which activities were captured in which Channel. And, if there’s a lack of confidence in the data, people start disregarding it.

Frustratingly, even when this Google Analytics savvy-team used advance reporting features such as expanding their report view to include Source/Medium as a second dimension of data (see screenshot below), the volume of data still obscured any insights to help them prioritize their efforts.

Google Analytics Channels report by Source Medium dimension

Google Analytics Channel report with Source/Medium as a secondary dimension

What does (Other) mean?

One of the frustrations of Google Analytics is the (Other) line item found in many of its reports. In the Default Channel Groupings report, it’s particularly difficult to discern what (Other) contains. Even when used with a second Source/Medium dimension applied, the underlying data still only makes sense to those familiar with the original UTM campaign parameter naming conventions. Even then, Other can take a lot of digging.

Instead, what if (Other) could be eliminated and the remaining Channels sorted into buckets labelled in a way that makes sense to your team? That way, colleagues would have much more confidence interpreting what the reports are showing them.

What to do? Take charge of the Channel rules

Fortunately, instead of using the Default Channel Groupings provided by Google Analytics, you can create your own, reflective of your own marketing-communications activities. Google Analytics provides a useful, and relatively friendly, “make your own rules” tool that allows you to override its ‘system-defined’ rules.

Thus, instead of hoping Google attributes your email traffic correctly, you can ensure your Email traffic does in fact land in the Email channel. Or, instead of having Google lump all your social traffic into Social, you can segment it into paid versus organic.

The ‘Custom Channel Groupings’ tool is in the Admin section of your reports, by View, under Channel Settings > Channel Groupings. With it, you can create a custom set of your own business rules to define Channels, and then toggle between it and the Default Groupings View. This screenshot below illustrates how you can toggle between the two:

Toggle between Default Channel Groupings and your customized channel groupings

Toggle between Default Channel Groupings and your customized channel groupings

 

Six steps to customize your Default Channels Grouping

You can create a Custom Channels Grouping report for your team using these step by step instructions. It’s time to take control of how your traffic sources are attributed in your Google Analytics reports!

1 Review your historical Google Analytics “All Traffic” report, ideally for a minimum of 3 months of data.

2. Look carefully at the “Other” group, and categorize it according to your organizational lingo. Do the same for Sources and Medium, identifying consistencies in both – by determining ‘typical’ sources and mediums (media, for the grammatically inclined). How do those compare to your activities? Which are the sources / mediums of traffic that represent your traffic driving activities versus sources of traffic you’re receiving ‘passively’?

3. In your TEST Google Analytics View (not sure what a TEST view is? See Why you want multiple Views in your Google Analytics), create a new custom Channel Groupings (View Settings > Custom Channel Groupings > + New Channel Groupings) report. In it, define your rules. For example, create a rule that states:

a) If “Medium” exactly matches “organic”, attribute that traffic to the Channel “Organic Search”; or

b) If Medium contains a string of characters generated by your email service provider, attribute traffic to Email

4. Leave your traffic to accumulate for at least 1 week in the TEST view. Go look to see where your traffic has ending up, by Channel. Is it where you expected?

5. Regularly refine the rules and with the intent of squeezing your ‘Other’ bucket to insignificance. Rinse and repeat to identify, classify and refine traffic as it materializes on your website in your TEST view. This is why it’s critical to build the report in TEST; it’s a safe place to refine your rules without affecting your production data.

6. Once you are happy with how your traffic is being attributed by Channel, re-create the same report in your Master View (again, see Why you want multiple Views in your Google Analytics). However – excellent news – instead of needing to recreate it manually, Google Analytics offers a wonderfully efficient way of “sharing an asset” within your own Google Analytics account, via email. In a matter of seconds, this feature allows you to ‘import’ your beautiful new Channels report into your Master View.

Once you’ve imported the new report in your Master View you can now choose to view data using your custom channels. Ta dah!

Below is a final screenshot that shows the difference in traffic attribution between the Default and the Custom Channel Groupings. Take note of a few of the items noted on the screenshot itself:

  • Red circle: Notice how (Other) has been reduced from 16.39% of the traffic to a mere 1.11% of the traffic? This helps eliminate confusion about what (Other) represents;
  • Navy blue circle: Notice how Referral has been broken out in to 2 Channels – MLL Brands and MLL Partners? For this particular team, Partners represents their organization’s strategic partnerships, showing them exactly how much traffic is coming from organizations whom they have formal agreements with (instead of mixing their traffic with other random websites that might be sending traffic). MLL Brands equate to this teams suppliers and represents a different expectation / relationship to the organization (known only to and meaningful only to that organization).
  • Yellow circle: Notice how Social has been segmented into 3 channels – “Paid Social” where paid media buys drove social traffic; “Organic Social (driven by MLL)”, representing traffic originating from their own organic, UTM tagged updates distributed through their own social media networks, and finally, “Organic Social (received by MLL)”, representing social media traffic they have received without sending out updates.

Default vs Custom ChannelsThis Custom Channel Groupings report offers the team much clearer insight into the impact / effectiveness of their efforts. This allows for faster decision making about which activities to pursue.

I strongly recommend you consider implementing it in your organization’s Google Analytics account.

If you have any questions or would like to discuss how to implement this at your organization, please feel free to contact us at your convenience. It would be our pleasure to put together a proposal for your review.

Have fun!

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Kelly KubrickAlign your Google Analytics Channel Groupings with your marcom plan